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Agencies hearing pet needs this Christmas
by Bill Baldowski
December 18, 2013 09:14 AM | 1075 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Samantha M. Shal
Douglas County Animal Shelter resource officer Liz Marino talks to Beetle, a 2-year-old boxer mix, near the Christmas tree in the shelter.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal Douglas County Animal Shelter resource officer Liz Marino talks to Beetle, a 2-year-old boxer mix, near the Christmas tree in the shelter.
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Christmas is a time for family and friends to gather and make sure that each other’s Christmas holiday season is delightful and enjoyable.

Liz Marino, resource officer with Douglas County Animal Control on County Services Road in Douglasville, reminds residents that “family and friends” also extends to those with four legs.

“Like no other holiday season, Christmas touches people’s hearts a little more and they are more compelled to not only reach out and do something for their human friends but animal friends as well,” she said.

Everything the shelter receives from the public means a great deal to the staff members because it is used exclusively to help the quality of life for the animals, Marino said.

That is especially true this year as 70 dogs and 56 cats call the shelter home.

One of the shelter’s newest incentives involves a special Christmas tree in the Douglas County Courthouse lobby.

“Each ornament on the tree has a picture of one of our animals at the shelter that we hope individuals viewing the picture will either adopt or donate to help support,” Marino said.

One of the biggest animal charity programs seeking donations this holiday season is the Hungry Bowl Pet Food Drive, which again this year is sponsored in Douglas County by the Four Paws Pet Sitting Service.

Having sponsored the event since this international drive was created in 2009, Four Paws has collected more than 8,000 pounds of pet food for local animal rescue groups and shelters.

Donations to pet-related charities have declined in recent years due to the economy, but the number of animals coming into shelters has increased.

It may also be related to the economy as some families are not financially able to own a pet any longer.

“For every animal that is adopted from our facility, there is another that comes in to take its place,” Marino said.

Locations to donate animal food include the Woodie Fite Senior Center, 8750 Dorris Road; the Highway 5 Animal Hospital, 3340 Hwy. 5; and the Curiosity Shoppe, 7322 Bankhead Highway.

For more information, call (770) 942-5961.
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