No variable specified
Black History Month poster contest held at Creekside High
by Nneka Okona
April 03, 2013 10:17 AM | 1650 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Katherine Frye.From left, Second place winner, Deontae Nelson, and third place winner, Osaze Stigler, with their certificates and artwork from the "Celebrate Your Heritage" poster contest at Creekside High School Tuesday morning.
Staff / Katherine Frye.From left, Second place winner, Deontae Nelson, and third place winner, Osaze Stigler, with their certificates and artwork from the "Celebrate Your Heritage" poster contest at Creekside High School Tuesday morning.
slideshow
During Black History Month in February, students at Creekside High were not only busy learning about notable African-Americans, but also translating their newfound knowledge into artistic creation.

Three students, two from Creekside High and one from nearby Bear Creek Middle, were the top winners in a ‘Celebrate Your Heritage’ poster contest.

Entrants in the contest were instructed to draw upon their heritage and the lessons they had learned and display them on a poster-sized piece of art.

Nilo Meja III, Deontae Nelson and Osaze Stigler were the winners in the contest, according to staff coordinator Christopher Cooper.

“The ‘Celebrate Your Heritage’ poster contest was organized as one of our major events for Black History Month,” he said. “We gave each of our students an opportunity to show through drawing what Black History Month means to them.”

Each of the students had their own interpretation of what both their entry and the month meant to them.

Meja, for instance, said he was inspired by the yearly tradition of reflection upon black history that February has become.

“What inspired me to draw the piece was the yearly tradition of learning and remembering the triumph of African-Americans throughout their history, in the month of February,” he said. “Also, my art teacher was the one who convinced me to do the contest.”

Nelson wanted to speak to the “hidden, abandoned and forgotten” parts of black history.

“Today, careers are all about rapping and singing in the famous world, but doing rightful, encouraging and better things will really earn you a spot in black history,” he said. “Back then, blacks were considered soulless but we lived up to improving our name in the world today.”

Stigler, on the other hand, chose to highlight the origins of Blacks in his piece.

“I decided to highlight the two most significant times of African American history which are, where we came from and where we are now,” he said. “I am proud to be an African-American because no other group of people have been classified at such low statuses and have risen to such great heights.”

Cooper said that, overall, all the entries were mind-blowing.

“To see the hard work that each one of our students put into creating their vision was amazing,” he said. “This is just one of the many events that Creekside High School will present to our students to allow them the opportunity to speak out and be heard.”

Creekside High School is at 7405 Herndon Road in Fairburn.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides