No variable specified
Child advocates to salute change agents
by Bobby Tedder
btedder@neighbornewspapers.com
April 24, 2013 11:53 AM | 1519 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Nathan Self 
Georgia Center for Child Advocacy board member Susan Duralde, left, and CEO Nancy Chandler show off the stuffed bears and other animals given to abused children.
Staff / Nathan Self Georgia Center for Child Advocacy board member Susan Duralde, left, and CEO Nancy Chandler show off the stuffed bears and other animals given to abused children.
slideshow
The Georgia Center for Child Advocacy’s Change Makers Breakfast is back to celebrate a bit of good news arising from deplorable situations.

The annual event is scheduled for Thursday at Schwartz-Goldstein Hall at The Temple in Midtown from 8:30 to 10 a.m.

The breakfast doubles as a salute to active advocates and a fundraiser for the East Atlanta-based organization, which provides intervention and treatment services to area children at risk for sexual and physical abuse.

For Susan Duralde, Thursday will mark her second time at the event — albeit under different circumstances.

A new Georgia Center board member, Duralde is on the program as a featured speaker. She plans to use that face time with those on hand to divulge how sexual abuse hit close to home two years ago.

“Attending the breakfast last year inspired me to tell my story and work on the center’s behalf,” said Duralde. “It was quite an experience that changed [the victim’s] life for the better and changed mine in ways I could not anticipate.”

The Georgia Center is a children’s advocacy hub that champions the needs of sexually and severely physically abused children in Fulton and DeKalb counties through prevention, intervention, therapy and collaboration.

According to a report released by the center, one out of every six boys will be sexually abused by age 18.

Thursday’s keynote speaker, area businessman David Moody, will share his own ordeal with audience members.

“It is always so difficult for men to speak of their abuse,” said Georgia Center CEO Nancy Chandler. “And, to have such a prominent, successful man talk of the impact of the abuse he suffered on his own life, we hope [it] can be an opportunity for others to not only seek healing if they have been abused, but to also help us financially.”

All of the organization’s services are free. Financial support from the community is needed for it to be able to continue those offerings, she added.

Tickets to the Change Makers Breakfast are free of charge.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides