Perdue defeats Kingston in Georgia Senate runoff
Jul 22, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
Busines...
full story
No variable specified
Dunwoody bookstore owner turns author
by Sarah Anne Voyles
svoyles@neighbornewspapers.com
July 25, 2013 04:41 PM | 2054 views | 0 0 comments | 51 51 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
Cliff Graubart, book seller and writer, with his first novel, The Curious Vision of Sammy Levitt and Other Stories.
Staff / Katherine Frye / Cliff Graubart, book seller and writer, with his first novel, The Curious Vision of Sammy Levitt and Other Stories.
slideshow
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
Cliff Graubart's first novel, The Curious Vision of Sammy Levitt and Other Stories.
Staff / Katherine Frye / Cliff Graubart's first novel, The Curious Vision of Sammy Levitt and Other Stories.
slideshow
Inside a colonial style house off of Spindlewick Drive stands a bookstore, where an author sits in the basement selling a variety of books.

Dunwoody resident Cliff Graubart moved the Old New York Bookstore to its current location in 1997. He turned his freestanding general bookstore into an online business.

“It made more sense,” Graubart said. “This allowed me to cut costs and go with the times since the Internet is becoming the place to look for rare books.”

The bookstore opened its doors in 1971, on Piedmont Avenue. It then moved three years later to Juniper Street.

Before becoming solely an online business, the bookstore hosted author signing nights. Graubart said these were mainly the idea of author Pat Conroy. Nevertheless, Graubart was inspired and decided to take his love for books and began to write. He started to write for Atlanta Magazine, Atlanta Gazette and other publications.

After writing for these magazines, Graubart crafted a previous idea of his about a Jewish boy who had a vision of Jesus in his recently finished book “The Curious Vision of Sammy Levitt and Other Stories.”

He drew inspiration for the lead character from his own life. Graubart has always been fascinated by the relationship between Jews and Christians, and also Christians who have visions of either Jesus or the Virgin Mary.

In the book, Sammy Levitt is about to have his bar mitzvah and sees a vision of Jesus on his rabbi’s door. Graubart said he originally intended this scenario to be a comedy, but instead it turned into something more serious.

“As I wrote it, it was not that funny,” Graubart said. “Coming of age stories are just relevant, and people identify with them because everyone comes of age at some point.”

Graubart, who is Jewish, thought the subject was interesting since he said Jews do not have visions. He wanted to write about how Jews navigate the world and how they fit or do not fit in.

His wife, Cynthia, also writes and has written four cookbooks. Recently she won the James Beard Award for co-authoring “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” with Nathalie Dupree.

To find the Old New York bookstore online visit www.alibris.com or www.abebooks.com.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides