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Henry Cooperative Extension to host plant sale
by Nneka Okona
February 12, 2013 11:14 AM | 1535 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Katherine Frye <br>
Frank Hancock, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, checks on cabbage growing in the Heritage Park Community Garden in McDonough Friday afternoon.
Staff / Katherine Frye
Frank Hancock, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, checks on cabbage growing in the Heritage Park Community Garden in McDonough Friday afternoon.
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The Henry County Cooperative Extension Service, 97 Lake Dow Road in McDonough, will host its annual fall and winter plant sale through March 8.

Proceeds from the plant sale will benefit local 4-H club projects that the service assists with throughout the year.

Frank Hancock, coordinator of the plant sale, said the sale has been successful for several years in a row.

“This is about the third or fourth year we have had this plant sale,” he said. “A lot of our 4-H clubs are funded off donations. We do the plant sale and starting the first week in April we get geraniums that we start selling.”

Orders will be accepted through March and those interested must pay in advance.

On March 16, plants will be available for pick-up 8 a.m. to noon at the extension service office.

Blueberries, five varieties of blackberries, Celeste fig trees, four varieties of muscadines as well as asparagus and strawberry bundles will be available for pre-order.

All blackberries, Celeste fig trees and muscadines will be sold in gallon containers for $7.

Blueberries, also sold in a gallon container are $10.

The asparagus and strawberry bundles are $25 per bundle.

Hancock noted the different varieties of both blackberries and the muscadines.

“We have five different varieties of thornless blackberries,” he said. “We also have four varieties of muscadines.

“They are big, plump muscadines. We tried to select plants that will do well in our area and are also available in our area.”

He also mentioned a bit about the blueberries.

“All of our blueberries are mid-season varieties,” he said. “Blueberries, the early ones, come in two or three weeks ahead of the winter season. We don’t have any of the early ones because the tendency for us to have a late frost in April.”

Hancock was hopeful about the spring season for plants.

“The plants are looking good,” he said. “I am sure that this year will be similar to what we have seen in the past.”

Information: (770) 288-8421.
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