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LifeLine Animal Services a refuge for South Fulton animals
by Nneka Okona
January 03, 2013 01:09 PM | 2564 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff Photos / Katherine Frye <br>
Chris Mitchell, front desk manager for Lifeline Animal Services, holds Pitty Pat, a kitten available for adoption through Atlanta Pet Rescue.
Staff Photos / Katherine Frye
Chris Mitchell, front desk manager for Lifeline Animal Services, holds Pitty Pat, a kitten available for adoption through Atlanta Pet Rescue.
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From left, Chanell Ogle and Ashley Midds, Veterinary Technicians for Lifeline Animal Services, try to comfort Duke as they put him under for surgery.
From left, Chanell Ogle and Ashley Midds, Veterinary Technicians for Lifeline Animal Services, try to comfort Duke as they put him under for surgery.
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LifeLine Animal Project, a nonprofit organization geared towards ending euthanasia of healthy dogs in animal shelters in Atlanta, has had their work cut out for them during the holiday season.

Although according to public relations director Karen Hirsch, there tends to be an increase in pregnant cats and kittens as well as puppies in late spring and early summer, there is another trend that is prevalent around this time of year.

“Sometimes there is a slight increase in the number of dogs and cats in February who were often Christmas gifts that, for one reason or another, are no longer wanted,” said Hirsch.

For those furry friends that owners no longer want to keep, Lifeline Animal Project is a refuge.

The nonprofit organization has more than one tenet to its operations, including a shelter for animals and spay and neuter clinics, that provide low-cost or no pay spay and neuter surgeries and sterilizations and vaccinations.

One of those clinics is located in College Park at 2533 Sullivan Road.

Clinics like the one LifeLine runs in both College Park and Avondale Estates are crucial to combating the overpopulation problem in Georgia, Hirsch said.

“People often don’t realize that 60,000 animals, including dogs, cats, puppies and kittens, a year are euthanized at Atlanta metro area shelters due to pet overpopulation,” she said.

Hirsch said this often happens because owners drop pets off at shelters, in hopes that they will be placed in a new home.

Because many shelters are bursting with far too many animals, however, the chances of a pet finding a new home are slim to none.

This is precisely why spay and neutering is important part of the process, according to Hirsch.

“It can prevent so many animals from being euthanized and LifeLine offers both affordable spay, neuter and vaccinations at our clinics as well as bi-monthly free spay/neuters in low-income neighborhoods, so there is really no reason for people to not get their pets fixed,” she said.

Spay and neutering also has other benefits.

“[Spaying and neutering] your pet will help prevent them from getting certain types of cancer and can often help with behavioral problems in males,” said Hirsch.

Appointments must be made at LifeLine for pets to be seen. Appointments are scheduled between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Information: www.atlantapets.org.

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