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Lithia Springs High vying for statewide STEM education award
by staff reports
September 10, 2013 03:17 PM | 2310 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Katherine Frye<br>From left, senior Kevin Lopez, son of Ingrid Marroquin, and junior Chris Hanvey, son of Tina Fowler, design and build a cardboard chair that can only weigh 7 pounds but must be able to hold a total weight of 300 pounds during advanced engineering class last week at Lithia Springs High School.
Staff / Katherine Frye
From left, senior Kevin Lopez, son of Ingrid Marroquin, and junior Chris Hanvey, son of Tina Fowler, design and build a cardboard chair that can only weigh 7 pounds but must be able to hold a total weight of 300 pounds during advanced engineering class last week at Lithia Springs High School.
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Lithia Springs officials are looking forward to the Sept. 27 Georgia STEM Education Award ceremony in Savannah where the Douglas high school could be one of six honored as the top high school in its field.

It is competing against Carrollton, Kennesaw Mountain, Forsyth Central, East Coweta and Ridgeland high schools for the awards, which recognize schools, programs, and companies for outstanding efforts and achievements in supporting and promoting science, technology, engineering and math education in Georgia.

The Technology Association of Georgia sponsors the awards in eight different categories, including high school and elementary and middle schools, post secondary outreach, extracurricular program, best use of technology in a classroom or program, corporate outreach and best STEM Day activity.

“It was truly a challenge for our judges to select the 2013 finalists from among more than 170 applicants from around Georgia,” said Michael Robertson, executive director of the Association’s Education Collaborative, in a press release. “We must continue building a wave of activities that will prepare our students for the global workforce they will inherit and we hope recognizing these organizations and their programs will raise awareness on the importance of STEM education for our state’s economic future.”

School principal Garrick Askew said the honor was “recognition of the work we’re putting in.”

“It shows we’re doing the right thing,” he said.

Winners in each category will be honored at the second Georgia STEM Education Awards event Sept. 27 at the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center.

Lithia Springs High School opened its STEM program in the fall of 2012, offering courses in engineering and biomedical science. This year, the school opened its STEM Academy, which enrolls students through a competitive admissions process.

Askew said the academy has 86 students. The school offers four courses each in engineering and biomedical science.

“Our goal is matriculation of the students into four-year schools,” he said.

All classrooms at Lithia Springs have access to technology through computer labs, mobile netbook labs, and mobile iPad labs. Every classroom has a Promethean board and an active response system. In addition, the school has a wireless Internet platform accessible to students throughout the campus to support their learning in the classrooms.

Students accepted into the school’s STEM Academy participate in courses that support their chosen STEM pathways. In addition to the six required Advanced Placement courses needed for completion of the school’s STEM course, academy students can take up to 12 Advanced Placement courses or enroll in post Advanced Placement courses including engineering calculus and materials chemistry.
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