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Roberson's stage talents overcome physical challenge
by Bill Baldowski
bbaldowski@neighbornewspapers.com
September 20, 2012 04:37 PM | 2571 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Although she is battling Lupus, Jainah Roberson has used her considerable stage talents to star in numerous stage productions developed by the Fine Arts Program at James Jackson Elementary School in Jonesboro.
Although she is battling Lupus, Jainah Roberson has used her considerable stage talents to star in numerous stage productions developed by the Fine Arts Program at James Jackson Elementary School in Jonesboro.
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Although Shakespeare wrote, “All the world’s a stage and we are but players on it,” it is doubtful he ever met a child “player” with as much drive, determination and downright spunk to overcome what many would call an insurmountable physical obstacle to begin establishing an on-stage presence as Jainah Roberson

She is a talented, enthusiastic, 9-year-old fourth grader at Jackson Elementary School who not only has overcome a little shyness to be on stage but has risen above something much worse, Lupus.

As the daughter of Christopher and Marla Roberson, Jainah, who is also in the school’s gifted program, has already appeared in numerous fine arts productions at Jackson, under the watchful eye of Molly Knowles, the fine arts program manager and theater teacher.

Among the theatrical productions Jainah has appeared in at the school include, “Beauty and the Beast,” “Willie Wonka,” “God and Goddesses Bake Off” and “Possibilities,” among others.

However, from a national standpoint, perhaps her most famous role was one with which she is very familiar and needed little time to study for, being the national spokesperson last year of the Lupus Foundation.

Her face appeared on many billboards and publications regarding the Lupus Foundation and its work in raising research funds across the country against this condition.

“I was selected because I am the youngest person to ever be diagnosed with Lupus,” said Jainah, who has no qualms about her condition and talks about it as comfortably as if it were talking about a common cold.

“The most exiting part is that as the Lupus Foundation spokesperson, I was on Atlanta television and in People magazine as well as on many billboards,” Janiah said.

According to Knowles, Jainah has played numerous roles on stage and has even narrated one of the school’s plays.

“Not only is Jainah a wonderful student but she is always willing to go above and beyond what is expected, whether it be classwork assignments or stage productions,” Knowles said.

“She is always smiling and encouraging others and is a joy and a pure delight to be around,” Knowles added.

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body, including skin, joints or organs.

With Lupus, the body’s immune system, which fights off viruses, bacteria and germs such as the flu, is affected in such a way that the immune system cannot distinguish between these foreign invaders and the body’s own healthy tissues. With Lupus, the body creates antibodies that can attack and destroy healthy tissue.

With good medical care and constant monitoring, those with Lupus can lead a full life, which is exactly what Jainah wants to so, although she is still a little uncertain of a career.

“I want to be an actress, a musician or a fashion designer,” she said.

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