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Sandy Springs Society aids children with music program
by Bobby Tedder
btedder@neighbornewspapers.com
July 31, 2013 11:40 AM | 2030 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Vivian Cheng, left, and Steven Chiou, play violins with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Vivian Cheng, left, and Steven Chiou, play violins with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Clarisa Colton, left, and Harrison Stenson play cellos with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Clarisa Colton, left, and Harrison Stenson play cellos with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Students from Franklin Pond Chamber Music play a free concert for participants of the Horizons Student Enrichment Program at Holy Innocents' Episcopal School.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Students from Franklin Pond Chamber Music play a free concert for participants of the Horizons Student Enrichment Program at Holy Innocents' Episcopal School.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore MK Guthrie, daughter of Lisa and Jim Guthrie of Roswell, plays the violin with a sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music during the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore MK Guthrie, daughter of Lisa and Jim Guthrie of Roswell, plays the violin with a sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music during the concert.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Harrison Stenson, son of Kimbra and Brenton Stenson of McDonough, play the cello with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program at Holy Innocents' Episcopal School.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Harrison Stenson, son of Kimbra and Brenton Stenson of McDonough, play the cello with a student sextet from Franklin Pond Chamber Music for the Horizons Student Enrichment Program at Holy Innocents' Episcopal School.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, sophomores Vivian Cheng, daughter of Alan Cheng & June Wang, of Johns Creek; Harrison Stenson, son of Kimbra and Brenton Stenson, of McDonough; and Ariana Mao, daughter of Qing Shi and Mark Mao of Atlanta, play a piece of classical music for students in the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, sophomores Vivian Cheng, daughter of Alan Cheng & June Wang, of Johns Creek; Harrison Stenson, son of Kimbra and Brenton Stenson, of McDonough; and Ariana Mao, daughter of Qing Shi and Mark Mao of Atlanta, play a piece of classical music for students in the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, Sandy Springs Society President Kate Dalba presents Ronda Restess, founder of Franklin Pond Chamber Music, with a book about the Sandy Springs turtles as a token of appreciation during the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, Sandy Springs Society President Kate Dalba presents Ronda Restess, founder of Franklin Pond Chamber Music, with a book about the Sandy Springs turtles as a token of appreciation during the concert.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore MK Guthrie, daughter of Lisa and Jim Guthrie of Roswell, gives the audience the history of the piece about to be played by the Franklin Pond Chamber Music sextet during the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore MK Guthrie, daughter of Lisa and Jim Guthrie of Roswell, gives the audience the history of the piece about to be played by the Franklin Pond Chamber Music sextet during the concert.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, Ronda Restess, founder of Franklin Pond Chamber Music, and Kay Watson, head of the Horizons Student Enrichment Program, shake hands during the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / From left, Ronda Restess, founder of Franklin Pond Chamber Music, and Kay Watson, head of the Horizons Student Enrichment Program, shake hands during the concert.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Steven Chiou, son of Salra Hsiao and Peter Chiou of Johns Creek, shows second-grader Christopher Castro, son of Ana Karen Castro of Sandy Springs, how to hold a violin after the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Steven Chiou, son of Salra Hsiao and Peter Chiou of Johns Creek, shows second-grader Christopher Castro, son of Ana Karen Castro of Sandy Springs, how to hold a violin after the concert.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Vivian Cheng, daughter of Alan Cheng and June Wang of Johns Creek, plays her violin with Franklin Pond Chamber Music during the concert.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal / Sophomore Vivian Cheng, daughter of Alan Cheng and June Wang of Johns Creek, plays her violin with Franklin Pond Chamber Music during the concert.
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Heading into its 25th year, the Sandy Springs Society’s impact is reverberating throughout the community as loud as ever.

Perhaps that was no more evident than last week’s by-kids-for-kids concert sponsored by the nonprofit women’s philanthropic entity.

A group of six child instrumentalists from Franklin Pond Chamber Music serenaded a group of their peers, the latter participants of the Horizons Student Enrichment initiative at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School in Sandy Springs. Both programs have gotten much-needed funding from the society.

“As we enter our 25th anniversary year, it’s gratifying to know we’ve made a difference in this community and wonderful to see two of our long-standing grant recipients working together to further some of the society’s goals by enriching the lives of children at academic risk through the arts,” society President Kate Dalba said.

The Horizons program is designed to be an avenue for youth at the Title I school poverty level via an individualized curriculum whose areas of emphasis include reading fluency, comprehension and spelling.

While its ultimate goal is to eliminate the academic gap so frequently experienced by at-risk students, Horizons also exposes them to enrichment as well as community service activities.

Thus, experiences like the Franklin Pond concert are likely to leave a lasting impression, said Horizons Director Kay Watson.

“It introduces additional opportunities to our kids and is a means of showing them something cultural and artistic, Watson said.

“[Last week’s show] will be particularly profound for them. … [It] allows them to see other children achieving and being successful through dedication.”

The society has contributed nearly $3 million in grants to organizations that focus on the arts, social services, education, historic preservation and conservation since its inception a quarter of a century ago.

Like Horizons, Franklin Pond — albeit at the opposite end of the achievement spectrum — is a noted beneficiary of the society’s philanthropy.

The Franklin Pond project welcomes gifted musicians ranging in age from 11 to 19 for six weeks each summer. While participants receive formal instruction, they are ultimately responsible for virtually all phases of scheduled public performances.

“The community outreach concerts benefit our students as much as they benefit our audiences,” said Franklin Pond founder Ronda Restess. “[Our kids] learn a sense of community service and hone important skills such as discipline, public speaking and the ability to convey their passion for music through performance.”

Information: www.sandyspringssociety.org.
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