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Students learn about Native American tools
by Adam Elrod
aelrod@neighbornewspapers.com
November 28, 2012 05:04 PM | 1805 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Interpretive Ranger Steve McCarty shows a native American fighting club and explains how it was used.
Interpretive Ranger Steve McCarty shows a native American fighting club and explains how it was used.
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Interpretive Ranger Steve McCarty shows a tomahawk and explains how it was used by Native Americans.
Interpretive Ranger Steve McCarty shows a tomahawk and explains how it was used by Native Americans.
slideshow
McCarty shows Indian spears and explains how they were made and used.
McCarty shows Indian spears and explains how they were made and used.
slideshow
Though most Paulding County children were on Thanksgiving break last week, they still received a chance to learn about “Native American Tools & Weapons” at the New Georgia Library Nov. 20.

The library hosted the event which featured Interpretive Ranger Steve McCarty from the Etowah Indian Mounds in Cartersville. McCarty brought all kinds of tools and weapons to show the children, but he did not just show them, he demonstrated and explained how each tool would have been used. The tools ranged from spears, bows and arrows to bowls, necklaces, and furs.

The attendees appeared to hang on his every word as he told the stories of the progression of each tool. They learned how the culture went from hunting and gathering to growing crops as the civilization grew larger.

One of the children, Selena Waters, of Hiram, said her favorite part of the program was a demonstration of one of the weapons.

“My favorite part was the blow gun,” she said.

She should know as she had a front row seat — seated about four feet from the dart’s path as it hit a Styrofoam target.

It was easy to see the kids’ faces light up as they got to pass around axes, and touch a rabbit skin pelt.

Library children’s specialist Jessica Hollis organized the event.

“It gives students activities to do when school is out, and that is something parents have been asking for,” she said.

It was easy to see how true the statement was as children began filling the library for the event. But the kids were not the only ones enjoying the presentation — plenty of parents were glued in as well.

“It’s a great way to get some living history without having to go to the site to get it,” said Kerstin Liberty, of Dallas.

The program was right on the children’s level, and it seemed McCarty really loved and knew his topic.

McCarty said his favorite part about teaching the children is the interaction.

“When you ask a question and they answer and they ask questions and you answer, and you know they really understand, is great,” he said.

He presented the information in a way that was “friendly and easy to understand” which seemed designed to hold his audience’s attention.

McCarty urged all those present to make the drive to Cartersville to see the Etowah mounds and learn more about the Native American culture. The mounds, a part of Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites, are open Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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