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Two area events seek to discourage students from texting and drivin
by Adam Elrod
aelrod@neighbornewspapers.com
September 25, 2013 09:25 AM | 1940 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
AT&T Pioneers Northwest Metro Club president Pam Elrod, right, smiles as nursing student Nadasha Crooks of Hiram signs a pledge.
AT&T Pioneers Northwest Metro Club president Pam Elrod, right, smiles as nursing student Nadasha Crooks of Hiram signs a pledge.
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From left, Pam Elrod, president of AT&T Pioneers Northwest Metro Life Member Club, and secretary Fay Corley display ‘No text on board’ decals while waiting for students at Chattahoochee Tech in Dallas last week.
From left, Pam Elrod, president of AT&T Pioneers Northwest Metro Life Member Club, and secretary Fay Corley display ‘No text on board’ decals while waiting for students at Chattahoochee Tech in Dallas last week.
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Kaci Dennis of Douglasville, who is studying psychology and math, signs a pledge not to text and drive with AT&T at Chattahoochee Tech.
Kaci Dennis of Douglasville, who is studying psychology and math, signs a pledge not to text and drive with AT&T at Chattahoochee Tech.
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Last week hundreds of Paulding college and high school students took part in two events which discouraged them from texting while driving.

Paulding Chamber of Commerce Chairman Don Barbour organized two AT&T “It Can Wait” events at Chattahoochee Technical College’s Paulding campus in Dallas Sept. 19 and at Hiram High School Friday.

“This is all in an effort to create awareness to ‘It Can Wait,’” said Barbour, who is regional director for external affairs for AT&T.

Out of Hiram’s almost 1,600 students, about 1,000 signed a banner indicating they plan to take the pledge not to text and drive on the website itcanwait.com. About 100 students signed it at Chattahoochee Tech’s Paulding campus

“It is really about changing behavior,” Barbour said.

Younger generations are more likely to text, which makes them more likely to text while driving, he said.

Hiram High School Principal Jason Freeman said school officials work to have a couple assemblies each year to talk about safe driving.

“Any way we can keep reinforcing that message,” he said.

Hiram Mayor Doris Devey was also at the school to help support the event.

The school plans to hang up the banner the students signed as a reminder of the commitment they made.

“I think it makes more of a difference the more you can put it in front of them,” Freeman said.

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