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Historic Randolph-Lucas House needs new owner and mover
by Caroline Young
cyoung@neighbornewspapers.com
August 28, 2012 11:38 AM | 3547 views | 2 2 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Nathan Self<br>
Wright Mitchell and the Buckhead Heritage Society are looking for a new location for the historic Randolph-Lucas House on Peachtree Road.
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Preservationists are close to a solution in the controversy regarding the historic Randolph-Lucas House on Peachtree Road in Buckhead.

The 2500 Peachtree Condominium Association Inc., the homeowners’ organization for the condo building that sits behind the 88-year-old house and owns it, wants the home moved. But it is going to cost about $500,000 to do so, according to Buckhead Heritage Society president Wright Mitchell.

“A lot has been going on behind the scenes,” Mitchell said. “Our goal is first and foremost [to] make it available to the public somewhere in Buckhead, as a nonprofit center, heritage center or something along those lines.”

So far, no one has taken the reigns in Buckhead. And, there is an organization, according to Mitchell, “very seriously interested” in buying and relocating the house, though he would not disclose its name.

“It’s just a matter of time and money,” he said.

Mitchell said Hercules House Movers estimated $350,000 as the initial “rough” price to move the house.

“You have site-prepping costs to put in a new foundation. Then once the house is situated, you’ll have additional costs associated with getting it up to code,” Mitchell said.

In June, Hakim Hilliard, the lawyer representing the condo association, addressed the Neighborhood Planning Unit-B zoning committee and concerned residents about the demolition permit the association is seeking.

Although the request for a permit was denied by the city of Atlanta, the condo association decided to appeal.

The case is on hold now and once the demolition permit is granted, there is a 120-day period in which the house must be moved before it is legal to tear it down.

Mitchell said the “over-arching goal” is to save the house, despite its new location.

“Right now, I think the condo association is optimistic for the house to be moved,” Mitchell said. “I think they’re willing to explore that, which is commendable.”

Hilliard did not answer phone calls or emails seeking comment as of Friday.
Comments
(2)
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Kate Brown
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September 27, 2012
Wasn't Hollins Randolph associated with the KKK?
Joanrose Mangan
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September 11, 2012
Recently came to the area - family member recommended A. Siddon's book and enjoying it ! so was quite excited to "find" the house - to tear it down would be a crime - perhaps some local group should look to Newport RI for inspiration and help.
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