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Families show appreciation with various traditions on Mother’s Day
by Caroline Young
May 08, 2013 12:21 PM | 3119 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Nathan Self <br>
Christian Favalli, owner of La Grotta restaurant in Buckhead with his mother Ursula Favalli.
Staff / Nathan Self
Christian Favalli, owner of La Grotta restaurant in Buckhead with his mother Ursula Favalli.
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Staff / Nathan Self <br>
Meg Harrington, owner of Huff Harrington Home and Huff Harrington Fine Art with her mother Eileen Feus.
Staff / Nathan Self
Meg Harrington, owner of Huff Harrington Home and Huff Harrington Fine Art with her mother Eileen Feus.
slideshow
Staff / Nathan Self <br>
The Rev. Marnie Crumpler, executive pastor at Peachtree Presbyterian Church, with her children Anna, 13, left, and John, 15.
Staff / Nathan Self
The Rev. Marnie Crumpler, executive pastor at Peachtree Presbyterian Church, with her children Anna, 13, left, and John, 15.
slideshow
The meaning of Mother’s Day varies from one Atlanta family to the next.

The Favallis like rolling fresh pasta and cooking up an Italian meal to enjoy leisurely with wine. In the Harrington household, Mother’s Day is more about taking the pressure off the holiday and relaxing. And the Crumplers like to pamper their mother with flowers and breakfast in bed.

Christian Favalli, general manager of Buckhead’s La Grotta restaurant, said his family has always taken Mother’s Day off.

“Having grown up in the restaurant industry where we pretty much, every major holiday, we are working, this is one our family has traditionally taken off,” he said.

Favalli and his brother Oliver meet their father Sergio, who is originally from northern Italy, at his home in east Cobb and spend the morning preparing the pasta and a meat or seafood course.

His mother Ursula grew up in post-World War II Germany and is from a “very humble background,” he said.

“My parents are the true American success story,” Favalli said. “It’s a multi-faceted kind of day where we say our thanks and appreciation, and kind of really celebrate all those things she’s done in her life, … and putting up with us for the last 35-plus years.”

Meg Harrington, of Huff Harrington Home and Huff Harrington Fine Art, both in Buckhead, said she enjoys having an unstructured Mother’s Day with her 94-year-old mom, Eileen Feus.

“It’s not necessarily the traditions. It’s more of what I learned and what I am trying to pass down,” the Brookhaven resident said. “What’s been passed down is her practicality. … I’m trying to instill that in my daughters, too.”

Harrington said she feels lucky to have a mother who looks out for her.

“It’s not about the actual holiday. Every day is Mother’s Day,” she said.

Harrington said she and her mother share leisurely lunches often, including on Mother’s Day.

Harrington’s daughters Molly, 17, and Lily, 15, “ease the burden” on Mother’s Day weekend, she said, and usually take care of housework and errands.

The Rev. Marnie Crumpler, executive pastor at Peachtree Presbyterian Church in Buckhead, said her children have made her breakfast in bed ever since she can remember.

“It’s really different when a 4-year-old does that and when a 15-year-old does that,” the Sandy Springs resident said. “In some way it’s more special now. As teenagers, they still want to honor their mom.”

This year, her daughter Anna will turn 14 on Mother’s Day.

“She was my best Mother’s Day present ever,” Marnie said.

Anna said, “It’s really just a way to be able to get to do some nice things for my mom because she does all this nice stuff for us, and a lot of times that can go unnoticed. It’s a day to be pampered.”

Her son John, 17, said he enjoys spending the whole day with her and planning the breakfast with his father, Mark.

“I make the French toast, …we always get her a big bouquet of flowers … and we top it off with orange juice,” he said. “I think it’s really cool our nation takes a day to celebrate our mothers — they’re a big deal.”
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