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Farmers, artisans offer variety of goods at weekly market
by Liz Marino
douglas@neighbornewspapers.com
June 26, 2013 02:49 PM | 1756 views | 0 0 comments | 79 79 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mother and daughter Tina and Judy Thompson, shop at the Yves Garden booth at the Douglasville Farmers’ Market on O’Neal Plaza in downtown Douglasville. Yvette McLean, right, whose vegetable farm is located off Chapel Hill Road, grows 40 different herbs and 30 types of organic vegetables. The outdoor market is open each Wednesday until November from 3 to 7 p.m.
Mother and daughter Tina and Judy Thompson, shop at the Yves Garden booth at the Douglasville Farmers’ Market on O’Neal Plaza in downtown Douglasville. Yvette McLean, right, whose vegetable farm is located off Chapel Hill Road, grows 40 different herbs and 30 types of organic vegetables. The outdoor market is open each Wednesday until November from 3 to 7 p.m.
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Douglasville resident Chef Treyce Avery, owner of Edible Entertaining, was scheduled to host a weekly cooking demonstration each Wednesday afternoon at the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market. She will be demonstrating farm to table meals utilizing local organic farm products from on-site vendors. Recently she was demonstrating how to make shepherd’s pie, using hormone and steroid-free ground beef from Heritage Farm and fresh carrots from Abundant Harvest Farm.
Douglasville resident Chef Treyce Avery, owner of Edible Entertaining, was scheduled to host a weekly cooking demonstration each Wednesday afternoon at the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market. She will be demonstrating farm to table meals utilizing local organic farm products from on-site vendors. Recently she was demonstrating how to make shepherd’s pie, using hormone and steroid-free ground beef from Heritage Farm and fresh carrots from Abundant Harvest Farm.
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Bead jewelry artisan Debbie Wolfe of Douglasville displays her handcrafted items. Her specialty is ‘awareness ribbon’ jewelry items which support illnesses and causes such as breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, U.S. troops, animal abuse, autism, Alzheimer’s and others.
Bead jewelry artisan Debbie Wolfe of Douglasville displays her handcrafted items. Her specialty is ‘awareness ribbon’ jewelry items which support illnesses and causes such as breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, U.S. troops, animal abuse, autism, Alzheimer’s and others.
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Alex Szecsey,  co-owner for Abundant Harvest Gardens in Winston, shows Sherry Hughes of Irish Bred Pub a bunch of ramp, a vegetable that only grows in the mountains near a trout stream, while she browses the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market. Szecsey moved here from Atlanta 23 years ago and has farmed since 1972. All of his produce except ramp is organically grown.
Alex Szecsey, co-owner for Abundant Harvest Gardens in Winston, shows Sherry Hughes of Irish Bred Pub a bunch of ramp, a vegetable that only grows in the mountains near a trout stream, while she browses the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market. Szecsey moved here from Atlanta 23 years ago and has farmed since 1972. All of his produce except ramp is organically grown.
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Yvette McLean, owner of Yves Garden, shows off her fresh greens. The organic gardener grows her crops featuring 40 herbs and 30 different vegetables at her farm off Chapel Hill Road.
Yvette McLean, owner of Yves Garden, shows off her fresh greens. The organic gardener grows her crops featuring 40 herbs and 30 different vegetables at her farm off Chapel Hill Road.
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Dawn Orndorff, with children Alex and Riley, shop for fresh organic products at the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market on O’Neal Plaza.
Dawn Orndorff, with children Alex and Riley, shop for fresh organic products at the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market on O’Neal Plaza.
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Some Douglasville residents recently took advantage of the weekly Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market on O’Neal Plaza in downtown Douglasville. The market is dedicated to offer naturally-grown and chemical-free foods, as well as crafts and more from local farmers, artisans and bakers. It is open April through October. For more information, call (770) 854-6174 or email douglasvillefarmersmarket@gmail.com.

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