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Morrow firefighter-paramedics train to preserve life
by Bill Baldowski
August 07, 2013 05:00 PM | 2868 views | 0 0 comments | 56 56 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic Keith Rush trains in a new cardio pulmonary resuscitation technique, now approved by the American Heart Assocition,which does not contain, as part of the method, any mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic Keith Rush trains in a new cardio pulmonary resuscitation technique, now approved by the American Heart Assocition,which does not contain, as part of the method, any mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
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Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic Kevin Pace attaches a "for training only" automated external defibulator, or AED, to a dummy as part of the department's contineous training to remain certified. paramedics.
Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic Kevin Pace attaches a "for training only" automated external defibulator, or AED, to a dummy as part of the department's contineous training to remain certified. paramedics.
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From left, Capt. Jeff Moss, the Morrow Fire Department training officer, goes cver the American Heart Association's recommended steps for treating a patient who has suffered a heart attack or stroke, prior to the arrivals of paramedics, with Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic, Lt. Paul Bonner.
From left, Capt. Jeff Moss, the Morrow Fire Department training officer, goes cver the American Heart Association's recommended steps for treating a patient who has suffered a heart attack or stroke, prior to the arrivals of paramedics, with Morrow Firefighter-Paramedic, Lt. Paul Bonner.
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Morrow resident Jim Duckworth trains in the correct placement of the hands to administer chest compressions as part of the non-mouth-to-mouth resuscitation method taught to the public by Capt. Jeff Moss, a Morrow firefighter-paramedic and the department's training officer.
Morrow resident Jim Duckworth trains in the correct placement of the hands to administer chest compressions as part of the non-mouth-to-mouth resuscitation method taught to the public by Capt. Jeff Moss, a Morrow firefighter-paramedic and the department's training officer.
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In Georgia, the state requires paramedics to attend training classes in CPR and other life-saving methods for 40 hours every two years to remain certified.

However, firefighter/paramedics with the Morrow Fire Department train far more that in order to provide top-caliber medical emergency medical treatment to residents.

Although Capt. Jeff Moss, training officer with the Morrow Fire Department, typically conducts these fire department training exercises, he has begun a program whereby Morrow residents can learn a new form of CPR which can greatly enhance a victim’s survivability even without the use of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

“The time it takes for trained emergency medical technicians or paramedic to arrive on the scene of a medical emergency, especially involving the heart in the form of a heart attack or the brain in the form of a stroke, can be between five and seven minutes,” he said.

“In the amount of time before trained medical help arrives, if no life-saving action is taken on the victim, significant damage can occur to vital organs due to a lack of oxygenated blood being circulated through the body.”

However, the victim’s blood is already oxygenated but, Moss added, because the heart has stopped, it is not being circulated through the body which is where the importance of chest compressions, even without mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, can make a significant difference in the person surviving.

Any type of cardio pulmonary resuscitation, even if it is only chest compressions on the patient, between the time a medical emergency occurs, especially a heart attack or stroke, and the time paramedics arrive, is critical to the patient’s survivability, Moss said.

With this new American Heart Association’s CPR method not requiring mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, he hopes it will relieve some of the hesitancy of someone giving aid to the patient in case of a heart attack or stroke.

Although Moss has been on countless emergency-related calls with the Morrow Fire Department, he estimated 80 to 90 percent of those victims who survived were having some form of CPR being administered before he and other paramedics arrived.

Although Moss is rarely able to do follow-up checks on all the emergency patients he has assisted at the scene of the emergency because of other emergency calls coming in, he believes he has had a hand in saving more than 20 people throughout his firefighter-paramedic training.

Asked how it feels to know you have saved someone’s life, Moss said it is equivalent to, “winning the big game.”

“For all the firefighter-paramedics, the satisfaction of saving someone’s life comes in knowing our countless hours of training and then the teamwork needed at the scene worked together to help save someone’s life,” he said.

“There is no greater feeling than that for all of firefighter-paramedics.”

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