No variable specified
Visitors enjoy revamped Palmetto Train Depot
by Noreen Cochran
November 05, 2013 06:58 PM | 1551 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
Gregory Rusch looks over some antiques donated by residents of Palmetto to display in the newly renovated train depot.
Staff / Katherine Frye / Gregory Rusch looks over some antiques donated by residents of Palmetto to display in the newly renovated train depot.
slideshow
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
Gregory Rusch shows off the exposed brick in the Palmetto Train Depot which was preserved throughout the renovation process and then adorned with historic photographs from the city.
Staff / Katherine Frye / Gregory Rusch shows off the exposed brick in the Palmetto Train Depot which was preserved throughout the renovation process and then adorned with historic photographs from the city.
slideshow
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
From left, Museum volunteers Gregory Rusch and Shirley Smallwood stand in front of the recently  renovated train depot in Palmetto.
Staff / Katherine Frye / From left, Museum volunteers Gregory Rusch and Shirley Smallwood stand in front of the recently renovated train depot in Palmetto.
slideshow
Staff / Katherine Frye / 
Various artifacts donated by residents of Palmetto line the walls of the newly renovated train depot.
Staff / Katherine Frye / Various artifacts donated by residents of Palmetto line the walls of the newly renovated train depot.
slideshow
The historic Palmetto Train Depot, 549 Main St., got a $1.2 million facelift nearly 100 years after it was built.

The Neighbor recently checked in on the landmark’s first year with its new roof, period-style lighting fixtures and restored hardwood floors.

A team of preservationists completed four years of renovations in October 2012 and the building now includes event space which can be rented for about $400 a night.

Among the workers was City Councilman Gregory Rusch, who as the president of Rusch Home Interiors donated about $50,000 in interior design and consultation work.

“It was a great opportunity to save the building, which was an eyesore but is now the jewel of the downtown,” he said. “People are really amazed how great it looks and appreciative that we saved it. Some older folks had memories from 50 years ago of going in there. It’s our centerpiece for Palmetto.”

One of its attractions is a museum, with free admission and a collection that has grown from when it first opened.

“The museum has things that were donated by residents that have historical significance,” Rusch said. “It’s pretty well done.”

Information: (770) 463-3377 or www.cityofpalmetto.com.

.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides