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'Profiles of Poverty' exhibition hits home
by Bobby Tedder
August 13, 2014 12:44 PM | 978 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Special / John Glenn
Men congregate outside a dilapidated house near English Avenue and Vine City in Atlanta, two neighborhoods frequently cited for poverty and crime.
Special / John Glenn Men congregate outside a dilapidated house near English Avenue and Vine City in Atlanta, two neighborhoods frequently cited for poverty and crime.
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Special / Stephen Morton
Homeless Liaison Officer Tom Gentner gathers contact information from a young couple living in Homeless Camp 8 South under the ramps of Truman Parkway in Savannah.
Special / Stephen Morton Homeless Liaison Officer Tom Gentner gathers contact information from a young couple living in Homeless Camp 8 South under the ramps of Truman Parkway in Savannah.
slideshow
Invoking the old adage, ‘A picture is worth 1,000 words,’ the images captured in the “Profiles of Poverty” exhibition greeting visitors to Colony Square in Midtown speak volumes.

The photography display — launched by the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Georgia — will be available to the public until Aug. 29.

“The photos are powerful and moving … an incredible exhibit,” said John Berry, society CEO and executive director.

As its title suggests, the exhibition is billed as a visual chronicling of the plight of Georgia’s most vulnerable populations featuring the work of photojournalists from around the state.

“Our goal is to raise awareness of the issue of poverty and highlight the fact that one in five Georgians are impacted by it,” Berry said. “And, very importantly, to show success stories.”

Images like that taken by David Tulis of Chanda Baptist holding 3-year-old daughter, Journi, illuminate the space allotted for “Profiles” — each capable of striking a resonant thematic chord.

Baptist and Journi were homeless, living out of a 1995 Volvo, until receiving assistance from the Sullivan Center at St. Vincent. They currently reside in a small apartment in College Park.

As curator of the exhibit, renowned photojournalist John Glenn was tasked with assembling the virtual collage of snapshots designed to, in part, prompt the haves to act on behalf of have-nots.

“I’m a lifetime photographer — I know the power of a dynamic photo,” he said. “There are people who are not able to pull themselves up … and a lot of people who [would be] willing to help, but are simply not aware of the problem.”

Glenn contributed his own work to the project, including a photo of men congregating outside a dilapidated house near English Avenue and Vine City in Atlanta. Less than 40 percent of residents in those neighborhoods are employed and 37 percent of houses there are vacant, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Images like those underscore the larger socioeconomic truths.

Case in point: Some 1.8 million Georgians live below the federal poverty level.

“Profiles” depicts a myriad of issues affecting the poor — both working and unemployed — including homelessness, hunger, health care accessibility and the plight of homebound seniors.

The indomitable spirit of many in tough situations and their moments of hope in the midst of despair are also at the project’s core, Berry said.

“The exhibit allows us to tell the larger story and cover many aspects [of] the complex issues,” he said.

“It is also a living, traveling exhibit that will gain much broader exposure around Georgia than an ad would.”

IF YOU GO:

o What: “Profiles of Poverty” photo exhibition hosted by the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Georgia

o When: through Aug. 29

o Where: Colony Square, 21 Fourteenth St., Midtown

o Tickets: free

o Information: www.svdpatl.org
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